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trending topics in last 20 posts.
Last 5 Posts:
· Summer Season Reports for North American Birds (TODAY)
· Sepulveda Dam and LA River (TODAY)
· Palos Verdes/South Bay Audubon Society Bird Walk at South Coast Botanic Garden (Aug 3, 2015)
· Vernon/Bell Semipalmated Sandpiper continues; better photos (Aug 2, 2015)
· Red-throated Loon and Osprey @ Playa del Rey today (Aug 2, 2015)
  1. Summer Season Reports for North American Birds LINK
    DATE: TODAY @ 3:53pm, TODAY
    Birders,
    
    Thanks to those of you who have already sent me reports of significant sightings in Los Angeles County for the Summer 2015 season (1 June to 31 July). I would be pleased to receive reports from the rest of you, ideally by 15 August.
    
    I’m interested in documented records of late spring vagrants in June and July, early fall migrants, significant breeding records (e.g. out of range, exceptionally late, etc.), and notable population trends (upward or downward) of our breeding
    species. As usual, I can glean most information about vagrant records from eBird. But it’s especially hard to glean significant breeding records, range adjustments and population ups and downs from eBird data, so it would be helpful to have you send me such
    information.
    
    Many thanks for your continued cooperation.
    
    Kimball L. Garrett
    Ornithology Collections Manager
    Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
    900 Exposition Blvd.
    Los Angeles, CA 90007 USA
    (213) 763-3368
    kgarrett@...
    http://www.nhm.org/site/research-collections/ornithology
    
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  3. Sepulveda Dam and LA River LINK
    DATE: TODAY @ 1:31pm, TODAY
    This morning there was a male Belted Kingfisher (FOS) on the dam in the Sepulveda Basin.in Van Nuys
    In addition there were the 5 usual herons/egrets species in the River and an Osprey near the Dam. Spotted Sandpiper and Greater Yellowlegs were now back in the river bed as well.
    
    Irwin Woldman
    Studio City
    
    
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  5. Palos Verdes/South Bay Audubon Society Bird Walk at South Coast Botanic Garden LINK
    DATE: Aug 3, 2015 @ 6:14pm, 1 day(s) ago
    Hi everyone
    
    You are all invited to join us for our monthly bird walk at the South Coast Botanic Garden on Sunday, August 9 at 8:00am. We will meet at the parking lot. The address for the Garden is 26300 Crenshaw Blvd., Palos Verdes, CA 90274
    
    Below is a link for this event with directions.
    
    https://www.facebook.com/events/411599182377519/
    
    Manuel Duran
    Lomita, CAtel: (323) 881-1811
    
    
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  7. Vernon/Bell Semipalmated Sandpiper continues; better photos LINK
    DATE: Aug 2, 2015 @ 3:43pm, 2 day(s) ago
    Birders,
    
    Sun 2 Aug
    
    Around 0800 the Semipalmated Sandpiper was still at the L.A.River north of Slauson Ave, about 1/3 the way up to Atlantic Blvd. New photos.
    
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/rbarth/19615649943
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/rbarth/20228367192
    
    Richard Barth
    West Hollywood
    
    
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  9. Red-throated Loon and Osprey @ Playa del Rey today LINK
    DATE: Aug 2, 2015 @ 2:58pm, 2 day(s) ago
    Hello birders,
    Today (Sunday, August 02), in the morning, I photographed a Red-throated Loon from the second jetty in Playa del Rey.
    There was also an Osprey in the same vicinity.
    If interested, here's the link to my today's photos:
    Playa del Rey (Aug. 02, 2015)
    
    Playa del Rey (Aug. 02, 2015) Alexander Viduetsky's Playa del Rey (Aug. 02, 2015) set
    
    View on www.flickr.com
    Preview by Yahoo
    
    Good birding,
    Alexander Viduetsky
    Valley Village, CA
    
    
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  11. LA River "Semi-Ringed" Plover LINK
    DATE: Aug 2, 2015 @ 11:52pm, 2 day(s) ago
    
    
    Birders,
    I thought I would post a brief synopsis of the Charadrius plover found today (Aug 1) by Tom Ford-Hutchinson and Jeff Bray on the LA River. At least two dozen people were able to view and photograph the bird later in the afternoon. After some limited discussion, there is no consensus that the bird is definitely a Common Ringed Plover. At best, it is an interesting (perhaps confusing is a better word?) plover that may be a Common Ringed Plover (CRPL). It may also very well be a Semipalmated Plover (SEPL). Below is some discussion of field marks as they pertain to the bird in question. I am certainly no expert in Semipalmated/Common Ringed Plover identification, so take this for what its worth.
    
    The bird appears to be a female or second year male. The face is brown rather than black, as are the sides of the breast band. It should be noted that the first California record in Davis in 2012 was identified as a SY male and showed a completely black face and breast band. I don't know if there is variation in this, but if not, then it likely isn't a SY male CRPL.
    
    The supercilium is rather broad and bold. On average, the supercilium is broader and bolder in CRPL than in SEPL, but there is variation in this mark.
    
    The white on the forehead (particularly the white in the supraloral area) did not extend backward toward/below the eye, although there was a small pale spot on the right side (not present on the left) below and in front of the eye that suggested this. The white extending toward the eye is better for CRPL.
    
    There was a narrow, pale orbital ring, possibly grayish in color. The orbital ring color is brighter (yellow to orange) on average in SEPL, although this varies with season.
    
    The mostly blackish breast band does appear relatively broad with a constriction in the center of the breast. To me it does not appear nearly as broad as the Davis bird (perhaps expected if a female), and in fact appears to me to be at the maximum range of SEPL (at least for a male).
    
    This bird had noticeable webbing between the outer and middle toes, but whether there was any webbing present between the middle and inner toes was less clear. CRPL has no webbing between the middle and inner toes, but may have limited webbing between the middle and outer toes. The extent of webbing shown on this bird suggest SEPL. Clear photos showing the webbing or lack thereof between in the middle and inner toes would be extremely helpful.
    
    The brown stripe that extends from the face to the base of the bill appears to be very narrow and adjoin the bill above the gape. This field mark is apparently only useful in basic plumage and juvenile birds.
    
    Of course as I write this Tom Ford-Hutchinson has posted to LACoBirds indicating that the bird appears to be a Semipalmated Plover based on the webbing between the middle and outer toes using my photos and the figure in Pyle's Identification Guide to North American Birds Part II. My photos of the bird can be seen here: https://www.flickr.com/photos/40928097@N07/.
    
    Tom Benson
    San Bernardino, CA
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
    
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  13. Correction for Webbing On Common Ringed Vs Semipalmated Plover LINK
    DATE: Aug 2, 2015 @ 11:26pm, 2 day(s) ago
    I've notice some confusion in the literature concerning the webbing on Common Ringed Plover and Semipalmated Plover.Paulson's original Shorebirds of the Pacific Northwest has it listed that there is minimal webbing between the outer and middle toes of Common Ringed Plover. However in Paulson's "Shorebirds of North America", on p. 13, it says Common Ringed has no webbing between middle and *outer* toes, whereas Semipalmated has webbing and likewise O'Brien et al "Shorebird Guide", p. 239 states that partial web between middle and *outer* toes is diagnostic forSemipalmated. To add to the confusion Pyle's Identification Guide to North American Birds Pt II has a figure on p. 501 with directional arrows showing the outer and inner toes yet the caption states the inverse. So who's correct?Fortunately a post written by Clare Kines on 10,000 birds documenting the banding of both Common Ringed Plovers and Semipalmated Plovers on Baffin Island where both species breed clearly states and shows with photos that Common Ringed Plovers have some minimal webbing between the outer and middle toes and no webbing between the inner and middle toes.10,000 Birds | Plovers, they?re harder than you think.
    
    10,000 Birds | Plovers, they?re harder than you think. Birding, blogging, conservation, and commentary
    
    View on 10000birds.com
    Preview by Yahoo
    
    So where does this leave us with the Los Angeles river bird? Photos show the bird has webbing between the outer and middle toes and it's less clear between the middle and inner toes, but....The amount of webbing between the outer and middle toes is extensive. For those of you with a copy of Pyle Pt. II and access to the figure 374 on p.501 this bird seems to fall on the high end of a C or D, whereas a Common Ringed Plover should be between a A and B.(T. Benson currently has the only public photo up showing this mark)Plover sp.
    
    Plover sp. Charadrius sp. 01 Aug 2015 CA, LA Co., LA River
    
    View on www.flickr.com
    Preview by Yahoo
    
    The other field marks are intriguing including the bold white supercillium, broad white forehead with white crescent towards the base of the eye, dark orbital, broad black uneven breast band, and the lack of contrast on the upperwing coverts. (Black and White marking towards the gape seems to be more of a useful character for juveniles, and bill length is variable -especially? among the slightly smaller ssp. tundrae). The brownish tone to the ariculars suggests that this bird may be a SY male, which may explain some of these inconsistencies. That being said the toe webbing is essentially diagnostic for Semipalmated, and while hybrids pairings exist between these two I don't want to get into that.At the very least hopefully we all learned a bit more about Charadrius identification.Tom Ford-HutchinsonIrvine, CA
    
    
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  15. Re: [LACoBirds] Mystery Plover = COMMON RINGED PLOVER?! LINK
    DATE: Aug 1, 2015 @ 4:50pm, 3 day(s) ago
    That's the idea. More scopes here now. Bird appears to have a grey orbital. Walk across to the south west side of the bridge for better light. The fence gate is open on the south side.-Tom
    On Aug 1, 2015, at 4:22 PM, Justyn Stahl <justyn.stahl@...> wrote:
    Why isn't this a COMMON RINGED PLOVER?
    Justyn Stahl
    On Sat, Aug 1, 2015 at 3:40 PM, thomas.fordhut@... [LACoBirds] <LACoBirds-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
    Jeff Bray and myself have been staring at this plover on and off for the past few hours. Unfortunately all of my birding equipment was stolen a couple weeks ago so our views weren't the best. That being said Jeff got this photo of the bird next to a Killdeer and Semipalmated Plover; https://m.flickr.com/#/photos/77523243@N00/19589081783/
    
    The bird is just south of the Willow Street bridge on the LAR. Figured I'd get the word out just in case. We should figure it once some more people who are on route get here.
    
    Tom Ford-Hutchinson
    Irvine, CA
    
    
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  17. Re: [LACoBirds] Mystery Plover = COMMON RINGED PLOVER?! LINK
    DATE: Aug 1, 2015 @ 4:22pm, 3 day(s) ago
    Why isn't this a COMMON RINGED PLOVER?
    Justyn Stahl
    On Sat, Aug 1, 2015 at 3:40 PM, thomas.fordhut@... [LACoBirds] <LACoBirds-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
     Jeff Bray and myself have been staring at this plover on and off for the past few hours. Unfortunately all of my birding equipment was stolen a couple weeks ago so our views weren't the best. That being said Jeff got this photo of the bird next to a Killdeer and Semipalmated Plover; https://m.flickr.com/#/photos/77523243@N00/19589081783/
    
    The bird is just south of the Willow Street bridge on the LAR. Figured I'd get the word out just in case. We should figure it once some more people who are on route get here.
    
    Tom Ford-Hutchinson
    Irvine, CA
    
    
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  19. Piute Ponds; 8/1/15; shorebirds and others LINK
    DATE: Aug 1, 2015 @ 3:53pm, 3 day(s) ago
    Birders:
    
    A/the juvenile Semipalmated Sandpiper continued on Rosamond Lake bed north of Duckbill Lake at the Piute Ponds with a flock of Least and Western Sandpipers. A juvenile Baird's Sandpiper was present in the same flock.
    
    On the Piute Ponds proper, two more juvenile Baird's Sandpipers were on Duckbill Lake with a smattering of Least and Western Sandpipers, a few Semipalmated Plovers, Whimbrel, Long-billed Dowitchers, Willet, Wilson's and Red-necked Phalaropes (including the first juvenile Wilson's I've encountered here this fall), Greater and Lesser Yellowlegs, and Marbled Godwits. One each of Black Tern and Common Tern were with Forster's Terns on Big Piute. Two Willow Flycatchers were on earlier end of their fall migration in the tamarisks along the C-Dike.
    
    Jon Feenstra
    Altadena
    
    
  20. -back to top-
  21. Mystery Plover LINK
    DATE: Aug 1, 2015 @ 3:40pm, 3 day(s) ago
    Jeff Bray and myself have been staring at this plover on and off for the past few hours. Unfortunately all of my birding equipment was stolen a couple weeks ago so our views weren't the best. That being said Jeff got this photo of the bird next to a Killdeer and Semipalmated Plover; https://m.flickr.com/#/photos/77523243@N00/19589081783/
    
    The bird is just south of the Willow Street bridge on the LAR. Figured I'd get the word out just in case. We should figure it once some more people who are on route get here.
    
    Tom Ford-Hutchinson
    Irvine, CA
    
    
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  23. Swans at Malibu Lagoon LINK
    DATE: Aug 1, 2015 @ 2:02pm, 3 day(s) ago
    Two Mute Swans today noon at Malibu Lagoon. A ranger reported seeing them yesterday as well. Also one Skimmer amidst the hordes of beach-goers.
    
    Bob Pann
    Cheviot Hills
    
    
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  25. Semi Sand @ LAR in Vernon/Bell area LINK
    DATE: Aug 1, 2015 @ 1:03pm, 3 day(s) ago
    Birders,
    
    Sat 1 Aug
    
    This morning there was a juvenile Semipalmated Sandpiper at the L.A.River about 400-450 yds north of Slauson Ave. The bird was with a few juv Westerns and usually near a large flock of Leasts. The Leasts sometimes flushed to different spots taking with them the SESA and the Westerns. You can park on Slauson Ave at the pull-out on the east side of the Slauson bridge. Two poor photos of the SESA:
    
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/rbarth/20212667541
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/rbarth/19585948653
    
    Richard Barth
    West Hollywood
    
    
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  27. Yellow-headed Blackbird LINK
    DATE: Aug 1, 2015 @ 12:24pm, 3 day(s) ago
    Saw a Yellow-headed Blackbird flying over the Ballona Saltwater Marsh during the Audubon walk led by Walter Lamb this morning. Other birds of note were a group of Wilson's Phalaropes and a Peregrine Falcon.
    Best,
    Bhaskar Krishnamachari
    Los Angeles
    
    
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  29. Los Angeles RBA- 31 July 2015 LINK
    DATE: Jul 31, 2015 @ 9:15am, 4 day(s) ago
    - RBA
    * California
    * Los Angeles
    RBA
    * July 31,
    2015
    * CALA1507.31
    
    -Birds mentioned
    
    Lesser Scaup
    Cattle Egret
    Yellow-crowned Night-Heron
    Semipalmated Sandpiper
    Least Tern
    Black Swift
    Pygmy Nuthatch
    
    California Bird Records Committee (report rarities as appropriate
    on the rare bird report form): http://www.californiabirds.org/
    
    Enter your bird sightings on eBird: http://ebird.org/content/ebird
    
    Hotline: Los Angeles Rare Bird Alert
    E-mail reports to: Jon Fisher at JonF60@...
    
    Coverage:
    Los Angeles County, Ventura County as warranted
    
    -Transcript
    
    This
    is the Los Angeles Rare Bird Alert for July 31.
    
    A
    female LESSER SCAUP was along the LA River in the Sepulveda Basin on July
    30. It was below the Burbank Blvd.
    crossing.
    
    An immature
    YELLOW-CROWNED NIGHT-HERON continues at the Ballona Freshwater Marsh. The marsh is at the corner of Lincoln and
    Jefferson in Playa Vista and the bird has been near the ?elbow? adjacent to the
    intersection. It was last reported on
    July 26.
    
    A juvenile
    SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER was at the south end of Rosamond Lake on Edwards AFB on
    July 27. Other birds of interest in the
    area included two CATTLE EGRETS and a PYGMY NUTHATCH (near the metal shelter
    along the C-dike).
    
    Also on
    Edwards AFB property is a continuing LEAST TERN at the Piute Ponds. It was last reported on July 28. Remember that a letter of permission is
    required.
    
    Another
    SEMIPALMATED SANDPIPER was along the lower LA River in Long Beach from July
    27-29. It was seen both above and below
    the Willow Street bridge.
    
    Three BLACK
    SWIFTS were over Claremont Wilderness Park and nearby Cobal Canyon on July
    25. The birds first appeared over the
    parking area around 5:45PM.
    
    This report is
    sponsored by the Los Angeles Audubon Society.
    
    - end
    transcript
    
    Jon L Fisher
    Glendale,
    CA
    JonF60@...
    
    EVENTS
    AND ANNOUNCEMENTS
    
    For
    all events, field trips and announcements, please see our website at http://www.laaudubon.org
  30. -back to top-
  31. "Open Wetlands" at Ballona this Saturday 9 AM - noon LINK
    DATE: Jul 30, 2015 @ 1:30pm, 5 day(s) ago
    All -
    
    Just a reminder that Los Angeles Audubon Society's "open wetlands days" resume on August 1 (this Saturday) between 9 AM and noon. More info at the link below.
    
    losangelesaudubon.org/index.php/recreation-mainmenu-189/bird-walks-mainmenu-190/1563-1st-saturday-open-wetlands-at-ballona-salt-marsh
    
    Please consider stopping by and bringing some friends!
    
    Walter Lamb
    Culver City
    
    
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  33. Lesser Scaup LINK
    DATE: Jul 30, 2015 @ 12:16pm, 5 day(s) ago
    This morning about 9:45 AM I had an early female Lesser Scaup duck in the LA River about halfway between Burbank Blvd and the Dam in the Sepulveda wildlife area. It was in the river water in concert with a few Mallards and a female Gadwall.
    The bird was smaller than its cohorts. The vertical white mark was clearly visible at the base on the all dark bill. Its head was not rounded, but somewhat peaked on the crown with the identifiable indented "bump" at the back of the head. There was a small vertical white mark on the face. The body was a patterned medium brown color. A white mark toward the rear of its topside signified a hidden wing strip, but without flight, I could not determine the length of that white wing stripe. At high magnification (+50 power) on my scope I did not notice a broad bill tip, indicative of the Greater Scaup.
    This was the earliest fall that I had seen this specie and rarely found in this shallow River bed. I had visited this location several times in the past couple of months and never saw a Scaup. No photo.
    
    Irwin Woldman
    Studio City
    
    
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  35. Re: [LACoBirds] Breeding Phainopepla on Palos Verdes Peninsula July 28 LINK
    DATE: Jul 29, 2015 @ 5:48pm, 6 day(s) ago
    Hi Steve,
    
    Great find! In Richard Bradley's Avifauna of the Palos Verdes
    Peninsula (Western Birds Vo. 11, No. 1, 1980) he describes the
    status of Phainopepla then as "Locally common summer visitor,
    nests in Rolling Hills. Rare winter visitor."
    
    Geo. F. Canyon was a historical site for them nesting. Whether
    or not there was photographic documentation isn't stated, but it
    was well known at one time they bred on the peninsula. They did
    seem to get scarcer, but I felt most was a lack of coverage.
    
    Around 2000 or so I was getting them in summer just up
    Malaga Creek from City Hall in the north fork of the canyon
    and suspected nesting there too. Never saw another birder
    there in June but did see Phainopepla.
    
    Mitch Heindel
    Utopia Texas
    formerly the PVP area
    On 2015-07-28 13:37, trogon30@... [LACoBirds] wrote:
    > Today, while hiking on the Sleepy Hollow Trail section of the bridle
    > trails behind the gates of Rolling Hills, I observed a female
    > Phainopepla feeding a begging fledgling Phainopepla near the top of a
    > leafless tree. There was a male around the area, too, as I heard its
    > distinctive, rising "wurp" call. I'd seen a Phainopepla in neighboring
    > Georgeff Canyon recently, and there have been Phainopepla sightings in
    > Torrance's Madrona Marsh, but I'm unaware of any documented,
    > photographed evidence of breeding Phainopepla on the Palos Verdes
    > Peninsula. Photos are here -- Fledgling https://flic.kr/p/wBGgN8 [1] ,
    > fledgling with female https://flic.kr/p/wBGgYZ [2] , fledgling
    > https://flic.kr/p/wAZvkY [3] .
    >
    > Steve Wolfe
    >
    > Portal, AZ
    >
    >
    
    
  36. -back to top-
  37. Semipalmated Sandpiper, LA River Willow St. LINK
    DATE: Jul 28, 2015 @ 1:56pm, 7 day(s) ago
    Birders,
    Based on a e-bird report from yesterday, we stopped by the LA River, Willow St., this morning, 7-28-15.
    We were able to relocate the Semipalmated Sandpiper found yesterday. We first saw it upstream of the bridge, then it flew off with 4 Least Sandpipers. We relocated the Semipalmated Sandpiper and Leasts just downstream of the bridge.
    Becky & Steve Turley
    Long Beach
    
    
  38. -back to top-
  39. Breeding Phainopepla on Palos Verdes Peninsula July 28 LINK
    DATE: Jul 28, 2015 @ 1:37pm, 7 day(s) ago
    Today, while hiking on the Sleepy Hollow Trail section of the bridle trails behind the gates of Rolling Hills, I observed a female Phainopepla feeding a begging fledgling Phainopepla near the top of a leafless tree. There was a male around the area, too, as I heard its distinctive, rising "wurp" call. I'd seen a Phainopepla in neighboring Georgeff Canyon recently, and there have been Phainopepla sightings in Torrance's Madrona Marsh, but I'm unaware of any documented, photographed evidence of breeding Phainopepla on the Palos Verdes Peninsula. Photos are here -- Fledgling https://flic.kr/p/wBGgN8 , fledgling with female https://flic.kr/p/wBGgYZ , fledgling https://flic.kr/p/wAZvkY .
    
    Steve Wolfe
    Portal, AZ
    
    
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  41. Piute Ponds, 7/27/15: Semi Sand and Pygmy Nut LINK
    DATE: Jul 27, 2015 @ 1:51pm, 8 day(s) ago
    Birders:
    
    Though not exactly at the Piute Ponds, a juvenile Semipalmated Sandpiper was with about 200 Least and Western Sandpipers in the mud at the southern end of Rosamond Lake, at the western spillout area north of the east end of Duckbill Lake. Getting there can be a little tricky if you haven't done it before, but it is possible to reach this area by walking north from the north end of Duckbill.
    However, shorebird enthusiasts don't be discouraged: the birds using Rosamond Lake regularly fly between there and the mud at Duckbill Lake where they are more readily visible. Duckbill Lake, though still the best habitat for peeps at the Piute Ponds was occupied by a Peregrine Falcon this morning and the peeps remained at Rosamond Lake.
    
    A juvenile Western Sandpiper was the only other juvenile peep in the flock.
    
    My best bird of the morning was a Pygmy Nuthatch in the big cottonwood by the metal shelter along the C-Dike.
    
    Two Cattle Egrets, a fresh juvenile Northern Harrier, and an Orange-crowned Warbler were new arrivals.
    
    As always: the Piute Ponds are on Edwards Air Force Base with restricted access. See: www.piuteponds.com for more info (and a map of the ponds complex).
    
    Jon Feenstra
    Altadena
    
    
  42. -back to top-
  43. Re: Yellow-crowned Night Heron at the Ballona Freshwater Marsh LINK
    DATE: Jul 26, 2015 @ 9:57am, 9 day(s) ago
    Sun 26 July
    
    At about 7:30 AM the 2nd-yr Yellow-crowned Night-Heron was back in the same spot where I reported it on July 2 (see below). Its white cheek patch is gradually being surrounded by darker feathers, but its crown shows no obvious yellow. According to the National Geographic guide. "Full adult plumage is acquired in third year."
    
    Also of interest, and highly unusual at the Freshwater Marsh (Jean Brandt & I have the only eBird entries), were two adult Black Skimmers that made several passes, some while skimming, along the Jefferson leg and the west end. After ~5 min they flew over to nearby Ballona Creek.
    
    Early Marsh Wrens are starting to show up, with one singing along the Lincoln leg last Thursday, but these early birds seem to be just passing through.
    
    Don Sterba
    Culver City---In LACoBirds@yahoogroups.com, <donsterba@...> wrote :
    Thu 2 July
    
    The 2nd-year YCNH that was hanging around Del Rey Lagoon in early June was
    at the "elbow" of BFM at around 8:30 this morning, perched atop a float
    near the opening of a water inlet (protected by a chain-link fence) near
    the end of a short dirt path that leads directly from the Lincoln-Jefferson
    Blvd intersection to the marsh.
    
    
  44. -back to top-
  45. Troupial in Baldwin Hills yesterday LINK
    DATE: Jul 25, 2015 @ 10:54pm, 10 day(s) ago
    Hi, Birders,
    
    More for purposes of alerting you to possibilities than anything else, we
    wanted to report that we had a beautiful Venezuelan Troupial in our yard in the
    Baldwin Hills near Kenneth Hahn park for most of the day yesterday. It fed from
    our hummer/oriole nectar feeders and our grape jelly feeders. Unfortunately, we
    did not see it today. So if you see something that looks like a
    Baltimore-Bullocks cross but with a BIG white wingpatch and blue behind the
    eye...think Troupial!
    
    Ann and Eric Brooks
    Los Angeles
    
  46. -back to top-
  47. Los Angeles RBA- 24 July 2015 LINK
    DATE: Jul 24, 2015 @ 2:52pm, 11 day(s) ago
    - RBA
    * California
    * Los Angeles
    RBA
    * July
    24, 2015
    * CALA1507.24
    
    -Birds mentioned
    
    Baird?s Sandpiper
    Common Ground-Dove
    White-winged Dove
    Lesser Nighthawk
    Pygmy Nuthatch
    Orchard Oriole
    
    California Bird Records Committee (report rarities as appropriate
    on the rare bird report form): http://www.californiabirds.org/
    
    Enter your bird sightings on eBird: http://ebird.org/content/ebird
    
    Hotline: Los Angeles Rare Bird Alert
    E-mail reports to: Jon Fisher at JonF60@...
    
    Coverage:
    Los Angeles County, Ventura County as warranted
    
    -Transcript
    
    This
    is the Los Angeles Rare Bird Alert for July 24.
    
    A
    BAIRD?S SANDPIPER was at Piute Ponds on Edwards AFB on July 17. Remember that a letter of permission is
    required for entry.
    
    The COMMON GROUND-DOVE continues at Linden H. Chandler
    Preserve in Rolling Hills Estates. It was reported through July 22.
    
    In
    the south Antelope Valley, a WHITE-WINGED DOVE was at a residence in Quartz
    Hill from July 15-16.
    
    A
    LESSER NIGHTHAWK was at the Ballona Freshwater Marsh (in the northeast corner)
    on July 19.
    
    Pt. Dume
    produced a PYGMY NUTHATCH along with a few early passerine migrants on July 18.
    
    A male and
    female ORCHARD ORIOLE were found on San Clemente Island on July 24.
    
    This report is
    sponsored by the Los Angeles Audubon Society.
    
    - end
    transcript
    
    Jon L Fisher
    Glendale,
    CA
    JonF60@...
    
    EVENTS
    AND ANNOUNCEMENTS
    
    For
    all events, field trips and announcements, please see our website at http://www.laaudubon.org
  48. -back to top-
  49. Dark Ruddy Duck continues at Silver Lake Reservoir LINK
    DATE: Jul 21, 2015 @ 1:44am, 15 day(s) ago
    Monday morning (20 July, 2015), an interesting-looking Ruddy Duck continued at the Silver Lake Reservoir (in the Silver Lake community of Los Angeles--a little over three miles N/NW of downtown). This bird has been around now for almost a month. Due to an LA DWP project that has me up that way somewhat regularly, I've found it an interesting bird to keep tabs on (if at all interested, see an earlier message I posted about the bird back on 27 June). Anyway, it's been with a shrinking group of Ruddies (now down to 25 or so). Although I am interested in looking more into this, I'm assuming this is a melanistic individual. There does seem to be some incidence of male Ruddies showing all dark heads, although I have only seen one reference to a female collected many years ago in Arizona that was apparently an unusually dark individual. This bird at Silver Lake appears to be a female, by the ghost image of a female Ruddy's facial features on the otherwise very dark head. The bird overall appears to be a very dark charcoal, or blackish, gray. The bird has shown evidence of molt (at least in the tail), and shows extensively pale mottling/barring on the underparts (and white undertail coverts). It has not noticeably changed in its appearance over the last month, and does not seem to be oiled, or otherwise stained. I only mention it again now as I hadn't realized (until Tom Wurster recently brought it to my attention) that one can see parts of Silver Lake Reservoir fairly well from the outside. The "Bluddy Duck" (sorry, that's short for "Blackish Ruddy") hangs out most often in the far south end (often just above the dam that forms the south end). This area can be seen from W. Silver Lake Drive on the west side of the lake, or from Silver Lake Blvd. on the east side. Parking is limited, but is present along one side of both of these roads (lighting better from east side in the morning).
    
    A few new images of the bird (taken 20 July) have been posted to my Flickr site.
    
    Doug Willick
    Orange, CA
    
    "Ruddy" Duck - Los Angeles, CA
    
    "Ruddy" Duck - Los Angeles, CA An apparent female Ruddy Duck, possibly a melanistic individual, at Silver Lake Reservoir, Los Angeles Co., CA 20 July, 2015. Present since at least 26 June, ...
    
    View on www.flickr.com
    Preview by Yahoo
    
    
  50. -back to top-


-revision history-
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
v1.2  - 11/23/11 - Greatly improved graphing technology - separates month vs. year by posts. Added species auto-complete functionality.
v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'. 




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