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trending topics in last 20 posts.
Last 5 Posts:
· Hooded Oriole & Worm-eating Warbler update (TODAY)
· Black-and-white @ Magic Johnson (Jan 27, 2015)
· Red-naped SS @ Woodlawn Cemetery (Jan 27, 2015)
· Cackler in Long Beach continues (Jan 26, 2015)
· Western Tanager and Inca Dove at Col. Leo H. Washington Park (Jan 26, 2015)
  1. Hooded Oriole & Worm-eating Warbler update LINK
    DATE: TODAY @ 11:55am, TODAY
    Wed 28 Jan
    
    Yesterday an adult, male Hooded Oriole was at the Raintree condos (gated community) in Culver City - probably too early to be considered a spring migrant.
    
    When I arrived at The Village Green at 6:43 AM this morning, the Worm-eating Warbler was already in a shrub next to the laundry room behind unit #5396. It stayed close to the laundry room, mainly foraging in leaf litter, until 7:32 when it flew north and disappeared into dense vegetation inside the walled-off backyard of unit #5390.On two occasions the WEWA flew a few yards north from the leaf litter and stopped in a red camellia in back of unit #5392 where it either preened or continued foraging near the base of the camellia, largely hidden from view.
    
    Don Sterba
    Culver City
    
    
  2. -back to top-
  3. Black-and-white @ Magic Johnson LINK
    DATE: Jan 27, 2015 @ 3:12pm, 1 day(s) ago
    Birders,
    
    Tues 27 Jan
    
    Approx 0900 I had a female-type Black-and-white Warbler at Earvin Magic Johnson Recreation Area in Willowbrook, in trees east of the northeast restroom building. I had trouble getting sustained looks as it preferred foraging high in a couple of pines while I was there.
    
    The continuing female Vermilion Flycatcher was on the island in the south lake.
    
    Richard Barth
    West Hollywood
    
    
  4. -back to top-
  5. Red-naped SS @ Woodlawn Cemetery LINK
    DATE: Jan 27, 2015 @ 4:12pm, 1 day(s) ago
    Female Red-naped Sapsucker seen and photographed today in the late morning (1120am) at Woodlawn Cemetery in Santa Monica. Found in one of the willows north of / behind the mausoleum. Probably the same one reported by Joyce Waterman last month.
    --Alex Coffey
    LA / Culver City
    
    
  6. -back to top-
  7. Cackler in Long Beach continues LINK
    DATE: Jan 26, 2015 @ 10:15pm, 2 day(s) ago
    LA Co. Birders:
    The Cackler that has been a regular at Scherer Park in Long Beach was seen late this afternoon.
    Donna Bray
    Norwalk
    
    
  8. -back to top-
  9. Western Tanager and Inca Dove at Col. Leo H. Washington Park LINK
    DATE: Jan 26, 2015 @ 7:47pm, 2 day(s) ago
    Birders,
    
    Today, my mother and I found a female Western Tanager at Col. Leo H. Washington Park in LA. It was working the trees on the SW side of the park. www.flickr.com/photos/jraymusic/15749245363/player/ Also present was the continuing Inca Dove.
    
    Julia Ray
    La Crescenta
  10. -back to top-
  11. Red-naped Sapsucker & Plumbeous Vireo in Culver City LINK
    DATE: Jan 26, 2015 @ 5:39pm, 2 day(s) ago
    Sun 25 Jan
    
    This morning there was a male Red-naped Sapsucker east of the tall TV antenna tower visible from the Playa St entrance to Holy Cross Cemetery.  It roamed from the pine tree just east of the tower to trees up and over the hill, and it returned to the pine.
    
    Seen on Jan 8 & 18, but not today (although there is an eBird entry for Jan 24 sans comments), was a Plumbeous Vireo in the Holy Cross area west of the first "T" intersection encountered from the Playa St entrance.
    
    Don Sterba
    Culver City
    
    
  12. -back to top-
  13. Red-naped Sap in Downey LINK
    DATE: Jan 25, 2015 @ 5:05pm, 3 day(s) ago
    Birders,
    
    Sat 24 Jan
    
    Of possible local interest, mid morning there was a female Red-naped Sapsucker at Furman Park in Downey (Rives Ave south of Florence Ave), moving around the north side of the park.
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/rbarth/16171146068
    http://www.flickr.com/photos/rbarth/16172866277
    
    Another note. Earlier AM the male Black Scoter continued off the Hyperion area at Dockweiler Beach in El Segundo.
    
    Richard Barth
    West Hollywood
    
    
  14. -back to top-
  15. Worm-eating Warbler & Townsend's Solitaire update LINK
    DATE: Jan 24, 2015 @ 12:49pm, 4 day(s) ago
    Sat 24 Jan
    
    At 6:43 AM the Townsend's Solitaire perched on the edge of the south-side roof of unit #5396, very close to the Worm-eating Warbler spot.
    
    The WEWA continued its early-morning arrival pattern near the laundry room in back of unit #5396.   At 7:04 AM I heard it give several loud, squeaky "tseet" call notes as it approached from the west and flew up into the west side of the huge Ficus between units #5396 & 5400.
    
    After foraging for a few minutes in the Ficus, the WEWA came down to the ground next to the laundry room and picked through leaf litter until roughly 7:25 AM when it flew off to the north toward a tall podocarpus. I did not see it again.
    
    Don Sterba
    Culver City
    
    
  16. -back to top-
  17. WPNP Cattle Egret followed me home LINK
    DATE: Jan 24, 2015 @ 12:52am, 5 day(s) ago
    I bicycled to White Point Nature Preserve today
    (Jan 23) with a tripod in tow, to try to get some
    better video of the Cattle Egret. The mission was a success.
    
    http://kingbird.myphotos.cc/n45_IMG_9651_Cattle_Egret.jpg
    http://kingbird.myphotos.cc/n45_IMG_9665_Cattle_Egret.jpg
    http://kingbird.myphotos.cc/2015_01_23%2013_46_16%20-%20Cattle%20Egret%20at%20White%20Point%20Nature%20Preserve.mp4
    (84 MB video file)
    (the egret catches two insects in this video)
    
    However, using MagicLantern to record raw video
    uses up card space very quickly. After 43 minutes
    at the preserve, I had already filled my 64GB
    card, and I forgot to bring the spares. So there
    wasn't much left to do before going back home.
    (The alternative would be locking up my bike and
    birding the rest of WPNP carrying the tripod and
    unusable camera, not an attractive option.)
    
    Imagine my surprise when, once back at home, I
    looked at the Cabrillo Beach shore (through
    spotting scope) to count Mew Gulls. There in
    front of the gulls was a Cattle Egret! And it was
    the same one — I could tell because it has a
    white stain on its right leg along the front of the bottom of the tarsus!
    
    http://kingbird.myphotos.cc/2015_01_23%2016_30_44%20-%20Cattle%20Egret%20at%20Cabrillo%20Beach.mp4
    (151 MB video file)
    http://kingbird.myphotos.cc/2015_01_23%2016_30_44%20-%20Cattle%20Egret%20at%20Cabrillo%20Beach.frame000295.jpg
    (still frame from video)
    and a photo from earlier at WPNP showing the identifying stain:
    http://kingbird.myphotos.cc/n45_IMG_9507_Cattle_Egret_showing_right_leg.jpg
    
    Timeline:
    1:01pm - arrive at White Point Nature Preserve
    1:15pm - approach and spot Cattle Egret in same
    area where it has been every time so far
    1:49pm - fill up CompactFlash card
    2:15pm - Cattle Egret confirmed to be still there
    as I passed it on the way back home
    2:44pm - head home from WPNP, with some brief stops along the way
    3:06pm - arrive home
    4:26pm - after processing and reviewing some
    photos, take a spotting-scope look at Cabrillo Beach and spot Cattle Egret
    
    David Ellsworth
    San Pedro, CA
    
    
  18. -back to top-
  19. Los Angeles RBA- 23 January 2015 LINK
    DATE: Jan 23, 2015 @ 11:11am, 5 day(s) ago
  20. -back to top-
  21. Re: [LACoBirds] January 22: Aqueduct Big Day LINK
    DATE: Jan 23, 2015 @ 9:16am, 5 day(s) ago
    The aqueduct crossings are all marked eBird hotspots visible in the Hotspot Explorer map (ebird.org, then click the "Explore Data" tab, the "Explore Hotspots" link, and navigate from there) - no eBird account required. Any data submitted to eBird for these hotspots is visible therein.
    
    --Jon
    
    On Jan 23, 2015, at 8:51 AM, EDWARD STONICK wrote:
    
    > Hi Jon!
    >
    > Very interesting report. Is there a list of the locations somewhere, especially the birdy ones in the Antelope Valley? Obviously, there must be some fish or other food source in the channels.
    >
    > Regards,
    > Ed
    >
    > Ed Stonick
    > Pasadena, CA
    >
    > --------------------------------------------
    > On Fri, 1/23/15, Jonathan Feenstra feenstra@... [LACoBirds] <LACoBirds-noreply@yahoogroups.com> wrote:
    >
    > Subject: [LACoBirds] January 22: Aqueduct Big Day
    > To: LACoBirds@yahoogroups.com, "inlandcountybirds (inlandcountybirds@yahoogroups.com)" <inlandcountybirds@yahoogroups.com>
    > Date: Friday, January 23, 2015, 8:41 AM
    >
    > LA and western San Bernardino County Birders,
    >
    >
    >
    > Yesterday, Dan Maxwell, Adam Searcy and I birded the
    > California Aqueduct from I-5 in the west to Hwy 395 in the
    > east. We stopped and counted birds at all road crossings
    > (and a few dead ends) - 53 locations in all. Many of these
    > locations hadn't seen another birder (at least according
    > to eBird) since all of the aqueduct crossing hotspots had
    > been created by Mike San Miguel Sr back in February-March
    > 2008. There were 6-7 more aqueduct crossings in Hesperia
    > between Hwy 395 and the mountains, but exhaustion and
    > darkness prevented us from getting to them.
    >
    >
    >
    > Most of the waterfowl in the Aqueduct were diving ducks:
    > scaup, Ring-necked Ducks, Common Goldeneye, Common
    > Mergansers, and Bufflehead, though there were a smattering
    > of others throughout. Numbers of ducks across the aqueduct
    > were not uniform. The greatest concentrations were in the
    > far west Antelope Valley (west of about 195th Street West),
    > with occasional pockets further east. It seemed that the
    > most remote places, where the Aqueduct was the only open
    > water around, also had the lowest numbers of ducks.
    >
    >
    >
    > Anseriformes Totals:
    >
    > Canada Goose - 7
    >
    > Gadwall - 18
    >
    > American Wigeon - 1
    >
    > Mallard - 275
    >
    > Northern Shoveler - 3
    >
    > Redhead - 6
    >
    > Ring-necked Duck - 282
    >
    > Greater Scaup - 1
    >
    > Lesser Scaup - 1159
    >
    > Scaup sp. - 651
    >
    > Bufflehead - 481
    >
    > Common Goldeneye - 62
    >
    > Hooded Merganser - 4
    >
    > Common Merganser - 71
    >
    > Ruddy Duck - 56
    >
    > Duck sp. - 15
    >
    >
    >
    > We also counted these other aquatic birds in the
    > aqueduct:
    >
    > Pied-billed Grebe - 3
    >
    > Eared Grebe - 3
    >
    > Great Blue Heron - 2
    >
    > American Coot - 227
    >
    > California Gull - 65
    >
    >
    >
    > It was an interesting experiment, and the public road
    > crossing are essentially our only access points to this deep
    > water "river" of across the Antelope Valley. Since
    > these crossings only occur every mile or so (usually more),
    > it's interesting to imagine how many diving ducks are
    > actually using it - quite probably way more than any other
    > single body of water in the immediate area.
    >
    >
    >
    > Jon Feenstra
    >
    > Altadena
    
    
  22. -back to top-
  23. January 22: Aqueduct Big Day LINK
    DATE: Jan 23, 2015 @ 8:41am, 5 day(s) ago
    LA and western San Bernardino County Birders,
    
    Yesterday, Dan Maxwell, Adam Searcy and I birded the California Aqueduct from I-5 in the west to Hwy 395 in the east. We stopped and counted birds at all road crossings (and a few dead ends) - 53 locations in all. Many of these locations hadn't seen another birder (at least according to eBird) since all of the aqueduct crossing hotspots had been created by Mike San Miguel Sr back in February-March 2008. There were 6-7 more aqueduct crossings in Hesperia between Hwy 395 and the mountains, but exhaustion and darkness prevented us from getting to them.
    
    Most of the waterfowl in the Aqueduct were diving ducks: scaup, Ring-necked Ducks, Common Goldeneye, Common Mergansers, and Bufflehead, though there were a smattering of others throughout. Numbers of ducks across the aqueduct were not uniform. The greatest concentrations were in the far west Antelope Valley (west of about 195th Street West), with occasional pockets further east. It seemed that the most remote places, where the Aqueduct was the only open water around, also had the lowest numbers of ducks.
    
    Anseriformes Totals:
    Canada Goose - 7
    Gadwall - 18
    American Wigeon - 1
    Mallard - 275
    Northern Shoveler - 3
    Redhead - 6
    Ring-necked Duck - 282
    Greater Scaup - 1
    Lesser Scaup - 1159
    Scaup sp. - 651
    Bufflehead - 481
    Common Goldeneye - 62
    Hooded Merganser - 4
    Common Merganser - 71
    Ruddy Duck - 56
    Duck sp. - 15
    
    We also counted these other aquatic birds in the aqueduct:
    Pied-billed Grebe - 3
    Eared Grebe - 3
    Great Blue Heron - 2
    American Coot - 227
    California Gull - 65
    
    It was an interesting experiment, and the public road crossing are essentially our only access points to this deep water "river" of across the Antelope Valley. Since these crossings only occur every mile or so (usually more), it's interesting to imagine how many diving ducks are actually using it - quite probably way more than any other single body of water in the immediate area.
    
    Jon Feenstra
    Altadena
    
    
  24. -back to top-
  25. White-winged Dove continues in San Pedro; Mew Gulls; Cattle Egret LINK
    DATE: Jan 23, 2015 @ 9:00pm, 5 day(s) ago
    The White-winged Dove was on the same utility
    pole (33.70991°N,118.28607°W, just west of
    Cabrillo Beach) today (Jan 22) at 2:58pm. It was
    also on another nearby utility pole (at
    33.71048°N,118.28560°W, at the top of Oliver
    Vickery Circle Way near the statue of Stephen M.
    White) on Jan 17 at 3:52pm for at least seven minutes.
    
    Here's the video from when I first spotted the
    dove (filmed at 4250mm 35mm-equivalent field of view):
    http://kingbird.myphotos.cc/2015_01_13%2011_44_23%20-%20White-winged%20Dove.mp4
    (166 MB file)
    
    Also, the Mew Gulls at Cabrillo Beach have finally been building in numbers:
    2014 Nov 03 - 3 Mew Gulls (first of season)
    2014 Dec 07 - 4 Mew Gulls
    2014 Dec 08 - 20 Mew Gulls
    2014 Dec 12 - 15 Mew Gulls
    2014 Dec 14 - 10 Mew Gulls
    2014 Dec 21 - 7 Mew Gulls
    2015 Dec 22 - 25 Mew Gulls at 4:43pm (on southern shore)
    2015 Jan 03 - 10 Mew Gulls
    2015 Jan 16 - 20 Mew Gulls
    2015 Jan 20 - 22 Mew Gulls
    2015 Jan 21 - 56 Mew Gulls at 4:27pm (on southern shore)
    2015 Jan 22 - 60 Mew Gulls at 2:55pm (on southern shore)
    (This is just a selection of my data, to give an
    idea of the ebb and flow of the Mew Gulls' numbers and local maxima.)
    
    And there's been a Cattle Egret at White Point
    Nature Preserve since at least as early as Jan 5,
    and since then has been there every time I've
    gone (the latest being Jan 18), foraging in the
    southwest grassy area of the preserve (around
    33.7170°N,118.3159°W). On some days I've seen
    it doing an interesting move that I'd previously
    only seen Great Egrets do while foraging in
    grassy areas; it kept its head steady while
    swaying its neck back and forth, as if to
    mesmerize its prey, while sneaking its head
    closer, up to the moment it would strike.
    (Actually that's what I'd seen Great Egrets do
    and how I interpreted it. At least in the videos
    I managed to record, the Cattle Egret seemed to
    be doing it more to scare up prey rather than
    mesmerize it, and possibly also to scan for prey,
    as sometimes it moved its head as well.)
    
    http://kingbird.myphotos.cc/2015_01_05%2015_13_09%20-%20Cattle%20Egret%20doing%20neck-swaying.mp4
    (40 MB video file)
    http://kingbird.myphotos.cc/n45_IMG_9089_Cattle_Egret.jpg
    http://kingbird.myphotos.cc/n45_IMG_9128_Cattle_Egret.jpg
    
    Please let me know if this would have been worth
    a dedicated post; from looking at eBird, Cattle
    Egrets are common enough in LA County not to be
    worth a post, but this is the first time I've
    seen one in my area, and the first time in my
    area I've seen any egret foraging on land.
    
    David Ellsworth
    San Pedro, CA
    
    
  26. -back to top-
  27. Two Varied Thrush and American White Pelican at Alondra Park LINK
    DATE: Jan 23, 2015 @ 8:43am, 5 day(s) ago
    Greetings Birders: There are now two male Varied Thrush observed only 2 minutes apart in time by car in two widely different areas of Alondra Park. One thrush occurs consistently for a week near a gated picnic shelter by the pond (lake) at Redondo Beach Boulevard. And the other thrush occurs near two walls adjacent to Manhattan Beach Boulevard just east of Prairie Avenue. The American White Pelican was alone yesterday, but a week earlier, there were 6 American White Pelican. Robert "Roy" van de Hoek, Los Angeles (Playa del Rey)
    
    
  28. -back to top-
  29. Plumbeous and Cassin's at Valhalla Cemetery (Burbank) LINK
    DATE: Jan 22, 2015 @ 3:55pm, 6 day(s) ago
    Birders,
    
    Thurs 22 Jan
    
    At Valhalla Cemetery mid morning a Plumbeous Vireo was in conifers 150 yards south of the small fountain about half-way down the east section. Later a bright Cassin's Vireo was in oaks 100 yards north of the aviation shrine at the east end.
    
    Richard Barth
    West Hollywood
    
    
  30. -back to top-
  31. Weird Grackle @ Legg Lake LINK
    DATE: Jan 22, 2015 @ 4:31pm, 6 day(s) ago
    The consensus on the Legg Lake grackle is that it's either just a very weird Great-tailed or a hybrid thereof. Common Grackle would have a smaller tail, smaller bill, rounder head, and would be more uniformly blue on the head and neck. It's still a bird of interest -- for example, I don't think it's a hybrid with Brewer's Blackbird, as has been suggested by some, because the bird's body doesn't seem to be intermediate in size between a grackle and blackbird -- it's a pretty bulky bird. A Great-tailed x Common hybrid seems possible, just from the bird's appearance -- or maybe it's just a very odd Great-tailed? Maybe more and better photos (in better light) would help. If you're in the area it's worth giving it a shot -- just look for the limp!
    I've renamed the photo files from yesterday and posted a few more pix of the bird here:
    
    Grackle_Legg Lake_1-20-15_RAHamilton_01a Thought to probably be either a weird Great-tailed or a hybrid thereof. The bird's body is not small, as would be expected of a hybrid with Brewer's Blackbi...
    
    View on www.flickr.com
    Preview by Yahoo
    
    Robb Hamilton
    Long Beach, CA
    
    
  32. -back to top-
  33. Ash-throated Flycatcher (Torrance) update LINK
    DATE: Jan 21, 2015 @ 3:42pm, 7 day(s) ago
    The ATFL was in the southeast corner of Madrona Marsh Preserve this afternoon, in the trees bordering Sepulveda Blvd.
    
    Ken Burton
    Eureka
    
    
  34. -back to top-
  35. Common Grackle @ Legg Lake LINK
    DATE: Jan 21, 2015 @ 8:09pm, 7 day(s) ago
    Hi All,
    
    Today (1-20-15) around noon I photographed a Common Grackle associating with ~100 Great-tailed Grackles and the usual assortment of other blackbirds, including at least seven Tricoloreds, near the southwestern corner of the northern pond (close to the parking lot off Rosemead Blvd). The Common Grackle appears to be a young bird, as its plumage includes a mix of old and new feathers and adults undergo a complete prebasic molt in the fall. It's quite dull, especially compared with the male Great-taileds all around, which are in high plumage and starting to posture and display; I wonder if it can be sexed as a female based on the paucity of color. The bird has a bad left foot; its gimpy gait is helpful for locating it in the flock. Three representative photos are posted on FLICKR:
    
    Robert A. Hamilton Explore Robert A. Hamilton's photostream on Flickr. This user has 48 photos on Flickr.
    
    View on www.flickr.com
    Preview by Yahoo
    
    Robb Hamilton
    Long Beach
    
    
  36. -back to top-
  37. Pasadena Audubon meeting Wednesday, 7:30 PM: Jon Feenstra, Ecuador High and Low LINK
    DATE: Jan 20, 2015 @ 5:42am, 9 day(s) ago
    All are invited to the January general meeting of the Pasadena Audubon Society.
    
    - presentation title: Ecuador, High to Low
    - presenter: Jon Feenstra
    - location: Eaton Canyon Nature Center, 1750 N. Altadena Dr., Pasadena, CA 91107
    - date: Wednesday, January 21, 2015
    - social time: 7:00 - 7:30 PM
    - general meeting and program: 7:30 - 9:00 PM
    
    Ecuador is a country approximately the size of Arizona and hosts more than 1600 bird species (not to mention an uncountable number of plants and insects). This remarkable diversity is due to a sweeping geography that includes Pacific coast, the snow-capped Andes, and steamy lowland jungle including a part of the vast and mysterious Amazon rainforest. New species are continually being discovered and parts of the country still remain remote and inaccessible. That said, it is also possibly the most accessible country in South America and well visited by researchers and tourists. In this presentation, Jon will give a virtual tour of many of the various regions of mainland Ecuador with comments on the habitat, stories from the field, and, of course, photos of birds.
    
    Darren Dowell for Pasadena Audubon Society
    
    
  38. -back to top-
  39. Worm-eating warbler continues, 1/19/2015 LINK
    DATE: Jan 19, 2015 @ 11:17am, 9 day(s) ago
    The worm-eating warbler showed up as I had hoped, at about 7:15 this morning, just behind apt# 5396, near the laundry room. He first appeared in the large ficus tree, then moved down on the ground along the walkway behind the apartment. He stayed on the ground for 5 to 10 minutes, then moved back into the ficus tree, disappearing after a few minutes. Between 7 am and 7:30 am seems to be his appointed time at that location. Got a couple decent photos, link below.Charles BakerTustinWorm-eating warbler
    
    Worm-eating warbler Village Green Apts, Los Angeles, 1/19/2015
    
    View on www.flickr.com
    Preview by Yahoo
    
    
  40. -back to top-
  41. Spotted Dove - not yet extirpated LINK
    DATE: Jan 18, 2015 @ 11:08am, 10 day(s) ago
    After dipping in LA Co. last year and also at Beale Park in Bakersfield earlier this week, with info shared by LACoBird contributors I finally found my Spotted Dove. The bird was located just north of Salt Lake Park (in Huntington Park). I'd been told to search north of SL Park in the neighborhood bordered by Zoe Ave., to the north and between Newell and Hollenbeck. I actually found the bird one block over on the NW corner of Bissell and Bell (where Bell changes to Saturn), just north of the park. A big thank you to those who emailed me with suggestions.
    
    Bruce Berman
    Sierra Vista, AZ
    
    
  42. -back to top-
  43. George F Canyon Sunday LINK
    DATE: Jan 19, 2015 @ 8:45am, 9 day(s) ago
    An astonishing number of Cedar Waxwings, American Robins, and Hermit Thrushes at George F Canyon on Sunday afternoon. Also 3 (at least) Varied Thrushes and a Western Flycatcher. The spectacle of the Waxwings and Robins flying in and out of the trees just behind the nature center was wonderful, and the Hermit Thrushes were going nuts in the toyons, particularly, a little up the trail. Any attempt at quantifying these species would be futile, because they were constantly moving, but more of each of them than I have ever seen in one place before.
    
    John
    
    John Thomlinson
    San Pedro and CSU Dominguez Hills
    "It is absolutely a crime for any man to die possessed of useful knowledge in which nobody shares." J.A.L. Waddell, 1916.
  44. -back to top-
  45. Veterans Park in Sylmar LINK
    DATE: Jan 19, 2015 @ 6:20pm, 9 day(s) ago
    Birders,
    
    Veterans Park in Sylmar should be renamed ?Woodpecker Haven?. Today, the WILLIAMSON?S SAPSUCKER (NE of the playground) and YELLOW-BELLIED SAPSUCKER (in the eucs near #7 disc golf basket) continued. Also present were RED-BREASTED SAPSUCKER (SE of the playground), NUTTALL?S WOODPECKER (several throughout the park), DOWNEY WOODPECKER (E of the playground), and NORTHERN FLICKER (below the playground). We missed the Red-naped Sapsucker and Acorn Woodpecker, but we know they are there. Also, near the pair of flickers, a female and male VARIED THRUSH were seen foraging on the grass. We know that?s no longer news, but we still enjoy seeing them.
    
    Julia Ray
    La Crescenta
  46. -back to top-
  47. Pelagic/Whale Watch Trip Results LINK
    DATE: Jan 18, 2015 @ 7:45pm, 10 day(s) ago
    Hi Everyone,
    About 100 of us from Pasadena Audubon went on a whale watch on the Voyager out of King Harbor in Redondo Beach today. We were the only group on the boat, and due the number of people, the captain was willing to go more or less where we wanted within the three-hour limit of the trip. This turned what had been a whale watch trip into a pelagic birding trip where we spent most of our time looking at birds.
    Thanks to expert guiding by Jon Feenstra, with contributions from many others on board, we found five alcid species, hundreds of black-vented shearwaters (some at distances of less than 10 feet because we were chumming), the usual gulls and cormorants, one humpback whale, one gray whale, at least two dolphin species, and California sea lions. The trip list appears below.
    Inside the breakwater (in the morning):
    16 species total
    Surf Scoter
    Western Grebe
    Black-vented Shearwater
    Brandt's Cormorant
    Double-crested Cormorant
    Brown Pelican
    Snowy Egret
    Black-crowned Night-Heron
    Black Oystercatcher
    Black Turnstone
    Sanderling
    Heermann's Gull
    Western Gull
    Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)
    Belted Kingfisher
    American Crow
    Outside the Breakwater:
    19 species tota
    Surf Scoter
    Pacific Loon
    Eared Grebe
    Western Grebe
    Black-vented Shearwater
    Brandt's Cormorant
    Pelagic Cormorant
    Brown Pelican
    Sanderling
    Common Murre
    Scripps's Murrelet
    Ancient Murrelet
    Cassin's Auklet
    Rhinoceros Auklet
    Heermann's Gull
    Western Gull
    California Gull
    Glaucous-winged Gull
    Royal Tern
    For those of you on the trip, you should have already received an eBird checklist for the birds inside the breakwater, courtesy of Susan Gilliland. I need to do a bit more work on the list from outside the breakwater so that will follow later, probably tomorrow.
    Thank you to everyone who came and made the trip so successful!
    Regards,
    Lance
    Lance Benner
    Altadena, CA
    
    
  48. -back to top-
  49. Birders and The Village Green as private property LINK
    DATE: Jan 18, 2015 @ 6:41pm, 10 day(s) ago
    Sat 17 Jan
    
    I recently forwarded to VG residents some "Thank You" greetings from birder friends of mine who have seen the Worm-eating Warbler, and likely other good birds, inside The Village Green's property.  VG residents have been extremely tolerant of us strangers in their midst, often in groups, granting us open access to their lawns and parking lots, and I want this easy access to continue.
    
    If you would like to contribute a line or two or three of thanks (as if speaking directly to VG residents), email them to me, and I'll forward them to my VG contacts for potential posting in their private Newsletter and/or Facebook.  I'd like to include your name and city of residence, too (or just your initials if you prefer).
    
    Don Sterba
    Culver City
    
    
  50. -back to top-


-revision history-
v1.23 - 12/08/11 - Added direct link to CBRC records.
v1.22 - 12/03/11 - Corrected GMT offsets on dates. Added last 5 posts at top.
v1.21 - 11/24/11 - Added direct link to range map for NA birds.
v1.2  - 11/23/11 - Greatly improved graphing technology - separates month vs. year by posts. Added species auto-complete functionality.
v1.14 - 11/22/11 - Added cloud bubble for common thread topics.
v1.13 - 11/22/11 - Added integrated photos where available.
v1.12 - 11/22/11 - Added multiple input boxes for additional refinement, negative search criteria (eg. -keyword).
v1.11 - 11/22/11 - Added banding code, species look-up. Also direct link to recent eBird observations.
 v1.1 - 11/22/11 - Added 'date' functionality. Shows top 'month/year' combinations for a query. Restrict results to that 'month/year'.
 v1.0 - 11/21/11 - Initial version coded. Currently archiving 'lacobirds' and 'calbirds'. 




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